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Lec 35 - Physics 111: Hall Effect In A Semiconductor

Physics 111: Hall Effect In A Semiconductor Physics 111 Advanced Laboratory. Professor Sumner Davis This video accompanies the Hall Effect in a Semiconductor Experiment, providing students with an introduction to the theory, apparatus, and procedures. The Hall effect is the phenomenon of a voltage developing across two boundaries in a direction transverse to the current flow in a system of charged particles in a magnetic field owing to the Lorentz force q(v x B). Semiconductors fall in between two extremes, conductors and non-conductors, and their properties require some knowledge of condensed matter physics. The Hall Effect illustrates the Lorentz force v X B. For a doped germanium crystal, you measure the resistivity, concentration of the free carrier, and the Hall coefficient as functions of the temperature. When a current is passed through a sample in the x-direction, the Lorentz force acting on the electric charges moving in a magnetic field B ( in Z) displaces some carriers in the y-direction and causes an internal electric field EH which cancels the Lorentz force in the equilibrium case. You will use the Van der Pauw method of measuring a sample of arbitrary shape for a temperature range from 300K to 77K to 400K. http://advancedlab.org

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Lec 1 - Physics 111: Atomic Physics (ATM) Part 1. Balmer Series

Lec 2 - Physics 111: Atomic Physics (ATM) Part 2. Zeeman Effect

Lec 3 - Physics 111: Beta Ray Spectroscopy (BRA)

Lec 4 - Physics 111: Brownian Motion in Cells (BMC)

Lec 5 - Physics 111: Instrumentation Section Lab Equipment (BSC)

Lec 6 - Physics 111: Bubble Chamber (BBC)

Lec 7 - Physics 111: Carbon Dioxide Laser (CO2)

Lec 8 - Physics 111: Compton Scattering (COM)

Lec 9 - Physics 111: Gamma Ray Spectroscopy (GMA)

Lec 10 - Physics 111: Hall Effect In A Plasma (HAL)

Lec 11 - Physics 111: Holography (HOL)

Lec 12 - Physics 111: Introduction to Error Analysis

Lec 13 - Physics 111: Josephson Junction Effect (JOS)

Lec 14 - Physics 111: Radiation and Laboratory Safety

Lec 15 - Physics 111: Laser Safety

Lec 16 - Physics 111: Atomic Physics (ATM) Theory Lecture ONLY

Lec 17 - Physics 111: Energy Levels Lecture Part 1

Lec 18 - Physics 111: Energy Levels Lecture Part 2

Lec 19 - Physics 111 Light Sources and Detectors Lecture

Lec 20 - Physics 111: Optical Instruments Lecture

Lec 21 - Physics 111: Energy Transitions Lecture Series

Lec 22 - Physics 111: Laser Induced Fluorescence and Raman Scattering (LIF)

Lec 23 - Physics 111: Low Light Signal Measurements (LLS)

Lec 24 - Physics 111: Non-Linear Spectroscopy and Magneto-Optics Part 1 (MNO)

Lec 25 - Physics 111: Non-Linear Spectroscopy and Magneto-Optics Part 2 (MNO)

Lec 26 - Physics 111: Atom Trapping (MOT)

Lec 27 - Physics 111: Muon Lifetime (MUO)

Lec 28 - Physics 111: Non-Linear Dynamics and Chaos (NLD)

Lec 29 - Physics 111: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Part-1 Continuous Wave

Lec 30 - Physics 111: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Part-2 Pulsed NMR

Lec 31 - Physics 111: Optical Pumping (OPT)

Lec 32 - Physics 111: How to do an Oral Report

Lec 33 - Physics 111: Optical Trapping (OTZ)

Lec 34 - Physics 111: Rutherford Scattering (RUT)

Lec 36 - Physics 111: Soldering Technique

Lec 37 - Physics 111: X-Ray Crystallography