Course: Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner with Wai Chee Dimock Dnatube

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Lec 1 - Introduction - Hemingway Fitzger ...

"Lec 1 - Introduction" Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner (AMST 246) Professor Dimock introduces the class to the works of Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and William Faulkner, the premiere writers of American modernism. She orients their novels along three "scales" of interpretation: global geopolitics, experimental narration, and sensory detail. Invoking the writings of critic Paul...
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Lec 2 - Hemingway's In Our Time

"Lec 2 - Hemingway's In Our Time" Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner (AMST 246) Professor Wai Chee Dimock discusses Hemingway's first book In Our Time, a collection of vignettes published in 1925 that launched Hemingway's career as a leading American modernist. Professor Dimock examines a cluster of three vignettes from In Our Time to show how Hemingway's laconic style naturalizes problems of...
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Lec 3 - Hemingway's In Our Time, Part II

"Lec 3 - Hemingway's In Our Time, Part II" Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner (AMST 246) Professor Wai Chee Dimock continues her discussion of Hemingway's In Our Time, testing four additional clusters of chapters and vignettes. She offers readings of each cluster that focus on Hemingway's logics of expressivity, substitution, and emotional resilience. She concludes that Hemingway mixes tragedy...
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Lec 4 - Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby

"Lec 4 - Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby" Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner (AMST 246) Professor Wai Chee Dimock begins her discussion of The Great Gatsby by highlighting Fitzgerald's experimental counter-realism, a quality that his editor Maxwell Perkins referred to as "vagueness." She argues that his counter-realism comes from his animation of inanimate objects, giving human dimensions of...
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Lec 5 - Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby, P ...

"Lec 5 - Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby, Part II" Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner (AMST 246) Professor Wai Chee Dimock concludes her discussion of The Great Gatsby by evaluating the cross-mapping of the auditory and visual fields in the novel's main pairs of characters. Beginning with an analysis of the Jazz Age, she argues that linkages between what is heard and what is seen have important...
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Lec 6 - Faulkner's The Sound and the Fury

"Lec 6 - Faulkner's The Sound and the Fury" Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner (AMST 246) Professor Wai Chee Dimock begins her discussion of The Sound and the Fury by presenting Faulkner's main sources for the novel, including Act V, Scene 5 of Macbeth and theories of mental deficiency elaborated by John Locke and Henry Goddard. Her main focus is on the experimental subjectivity of the novel's...
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Lec 7 - Faulkner's The Sound and the Fur ...

"Lec 7 - Faulkner's The Sound and the Fury, Part II" Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner (AMST 246) Professor Wai Chee Dimock continues her discussion of The Sound and the Fury by juxtaposing Quentin's stream-of-consciousness to his brother Benjy's narrative subjectivity. Professor Dimock argues that Faulkner uses stylistic parallels between the two sections to communicate "kinship" and...
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Lec 8 - Faulkner's The Sound and the Fur ...

"Lec 8 - Faulkner's The Sound and the Fury, Part III" Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner (AMST 246) Warning: This lecture contains graphic content and/or adult language that some viewers may find disturbing Professor Wai Chee Dimock discusses Jason's section of The Sound and the Fury with reference to Raymond Williams's notion of the "knowable community." Jasons's narrative is characterized...
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Lec 9 - Faulkner's The Sound and the Fur ...

"Lec 9 - Faulkner's The Sound and the Fury, Part IV" Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner (AMST 246) Professor Wai Chee Dimock closes her reading of The Sound and the Fury by reading section four -- the section related by an omniscient narrator -- through Luster and Dilsey, the two black characters whose personal and racial histories are woven into the history of the Compson family. Luster and...
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Lec 10 - Hemingway -- To Have and Have Not

"Lec 10 - Hemingway -- To Have and Have Not" Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner (AMST 246) Professor Wai Chee Dimock introduces the class to Hemingway's novel To Have and Have Not, which originally appeared as a series of short stories in Cosmopolitan and Esquire magazines. She focuses on Hemingway's designation of taxanomic groups ("types") by race, class, and sexuality, arguing that...
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Lec 11 - Hemingway -- To Have and Have Not

"Lec 11 - Hemingway -- To Have and Have Not" Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner (AMST 246) Professor Wai Chee Dimock concludes her discussion of To Have and Have Not by showing how, in the context of the Cuban Revolutions and the Great Depression, characters devolve into those who "Have" and those who "Have Not." While protagonist Harry Morgan may look like a political and economic "Have Not"...
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Lec 12 - Fitzgerald --

"Lec 12 - Fitzgerald -- " Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner (AMST 246) Professor Wai Chee Dimock demonstrates how four of Fitzgerald's most famous short stories -- "The Rich Boy," "Babylon Revisited," "The Diamond as Big as the Ritz," and "Bernice Bobs Her Hair" -- represent "social types," generic identities that Fitzgerald explores as forms of social reality. She reads the dramatic tension...
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Lec 13 - Faulkner -- As I Lay Dying

"Lec 13 - Faulkner -- As I Lay Dying" Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner (AMST 246) Professor Wai Chee Dimock begins her discussion of Faulkner's As I Lay Dying by orienting the novel to the Great Depression in the South, as focalized through such famous texts as Let Us Now Praise Famous Men. Once this macro history is established, she reads the narrative techniques of As I Lay Dying through...
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Lec 14 - Faulkner -- As I Lay Dying, Part II

"Lec 14 - Faulkner -- As I Lay Dying, Part II" Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner (AMST 246) Professor Wai Chee Dimock traces Faulkner's appropriation of the epic genre through two conventions: the blurring of boundaries between humans and non-humans and the resurrection of the dead. She first reads Faulkner's minor character Tull and his relation to both mules and buzzards to draw out the...
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Lec 15 - Faulkner -- As I Lay Dying

"Lec 15 - Faulkner -- As I Lay Dying" Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner (AMST 246) Professor Wai Chee Dimock concludes her discussion of As I Lay Dying with an analysis of its generic form. Using Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlett Letter to anchor her discussion of the American literary tradition, she argues that As I Lay Dying continually negotiates the comic and the tragic genres as we shift...
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Lec 16 - Hemingway -- For Whom the Bell ...

"Lec 16 - Hemingway -- For Whom the Bell Tolls" Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner (AMST 246) Professor Wai Chee Dimock begins her discussion of Hemingway's For Whom the Bell Tolls with an overview of the Spanish Civil War, the historical event at the heart of the novel. She introduces the notion of an "involuntary foreigner" to discuss the fate of Hemingway's American protagonist Robert...
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Lec 17 - Hemingway -- For Whom the Bell ...

"Lec 17 - Hemingway -- For Whom the Bell Tolls" Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner (AMST 246) Professor Wai Chee Dimock continues her discussion of For Whom the Bell Tolls by analyzing the contrast Robert Jordan draws between "distant homes" and the on-site environment of the Spanish Civil War. She juxtaposes his invocations of Paris and Missouri to the rooted communities of the guerillas, and...
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Lec 18 - Hemingway -- For Whom the Bell ...

"Lec 18 - Hemingway -- For Whom the Bell Tolls (continued)" Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner (AMST 246) Professor Wai Chee Dimock focuses on the themes of dying and not dying that reappear throughout For Whom the Bell Tolls. Marshaling Elaine Scarry's argument on the aesthetics of killing, she reads the execution of the Fascists as a representation of both aesthetic and ethical "ugliness" in...
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Lec 19 - Hemingway -- For Whom the Bell ...

"Lec 19 - Hemingway -- For Whom the Bell Tolls (continued)" Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner (AMST 246) Professor Wai Chee Dimock concludes her discussion of For Whom the Bell Tolls by reading the novel as a narrative of dispossession and repossession. She argues that the rape of Maria, which takes place in front of a barbershop mirror, enacts one type of disempowerment; the end of Robert...
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Lec 20 - Fitzgerald - Tender Is the Night

"Lec 20 - Fitzgerald - Tender Is the Night" Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner (AMST 246) Professor Wai Chee Dimock positions her reading of Tender Is the Night alongside F. Scott Fitzgerald's career as a Hollywood screenwriter. She shows how the novel borrows narrative techniques from film, particularly flashback, "switchability" on a macro and micro scale, and montage. Invoking the theories...
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Lec 21 - Fitzgerald, Tender is the Night ...

"Lec 21 - Fitzgerald, Tender is the Night (continued)" Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner (AMST 246) Professor Wai Chee Dimock concludes her discussion of Tender Is the Night with a biographical sketch of Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald's mental instability, the inspiration for the character of Nicole Diver. Invoking the schema of "have" and "have not," she then shows how Fitzgerald borrows techniques...
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Lec 22 - Faulkner, Light in August

"Lec 22 - Faulkner, Light in August" Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner (AMST 246) Professor Wai Chee Dimock focuses her introductory lecture on Faulkner's Light in August on the "pagan quality" of his protagonist Lena. She argues that Faulkner uses Lena to update the classic story of the unwed mother by fusing comedy with the epic road novel. In doing so, he also updates the Greek tradition of...
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Lec 23 - Faulkner, Light in August (cont ...

"Lec 23 - Faulkner, Light in August (continued)" Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner (AMST 246) Professor Wai Chee Dimock continues her discussion of Light in August by showing how the kindness of strangers turns into malice in the cases of social reformer Joanna Burden and Reverend Hightower. Whereas that malice assumes comedic tones in the depiction of Joanna's death, it has more complex...
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Lec 24 - Faulkner, Light in August (cont ...

"Lec 24 - Faulkner, Light in August (continued)" Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner (AMST 246) Professor Wai Chee Dimock focuses on the unresolved problem of race in Light in August, focusing her discussion on the variety of reflexive and calculated uses of the word "nigger" as a charged term toward Joe Christmas. She shows how the semantic burden of the word varies -- used under duress by Joe...
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Lec Last - Faulkner, Light in August (co ...

"Lec Last - Faulkner, Light in August (continued) " Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner (AMST 246) Professor Wai Chee Dimock concludes her discussion of Light in August and the semester by mapping Faulkner's theology of Calvinist predestination onto race. Using Nella Larsen's novel Passing as an intertext, she shows how Joe Christmas's decision to self-blacken expresses his tragic sense of being...

Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner with Wai Chee Dimock


Source of these courses is Yale 
This course examines major works by Hemingway, Fitzgerald, and Faulkner, exploring their interconnections on three analytic scales: the macro history of the United States and the world; the formal and stylistic innovations of modernism; and the small details of sensory input and psychic life. Warning: Some of the lectures in this course contain graphic content and/or adult language that some users may find disturbing.
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COURSE NAME: Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner with Wai Chee Dimock

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